25122 Regal Drive

Abingdon, VA 24211

Phone

1-276-628-7151

Email Address

“Despite facing a number of unique obstacles due to the plant’s location and high water pressure conditions, the WCSA project is being successfully completed under budget with a larger capacity than originally expected,” says Amy McIntosh, assistant editor at Scranton Gillette Communications, which publishes WWD. “The addition of the energy recovery station was an innovative way to combat the high water pressure conditions.” The majority of the project is expected to be fully operational by February, according to Cornett. View the complete list of WWD 2012 Top Project winners with information about individual projects.[/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][/et_pb_section]Engineers created a unique design that included a submersed intake structure outside the historically sensitive area on the South Fork, where turbidity was lower. Tube settlers and adsorption clarifiers were added, along with five new filters and Francis turbines in a new energy recovery station. Testing conducted in cold weather, cold water and high-turbidity conditions proved the design a success. “Despite facing a number of unique obstacles due to the plant’s location and high water pressure conditions, the WCSA project is being successfully completed under budget with a larger capacity than originally expected,” says Amy McIntosh, assistant editor at Scranton Gillette Communications, which publishes WWD. “The addition of the energy recovery station was an innovative way to combat the high water pressure conditions.” The majority of the project is expected to be fully operational by February, according to Cornett. View the complete list of WWD 2012 Top Project winners with information about individual projects.[/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][/et_pb_section]The WCSA-winning project began construction in 2010, when a new raw water intake and treatment facility expansion were required to meet residents’ countywide water supply needs. However, project planning, permitting, property acquisition and design began more than 20 years earlier. Engineers created a unique design that included a submersed intake structure outside the historically sensitive area on the South Fork, where turbidity was lower. Tube settlers and adsorption clarifiers were added, along with five new filters and Francis turbines in a new energy recovery station. Testing conducted in cold weather, cold water and high-turbidity conditions proved the design a success. “Despite facing a number of unique obstacles due to the plant’s location and high water pressure conditions, the WCSA project is being successfully completed under budget with a larger capacity than originally expected,” says Amy McIntosh, assistant editor at Scranton Gillette Communications, which publishes WWD. “The addition of the energy recovery station was an innovative way to combat the high water pressure conditions.” The majority of the project is expected to be fully operational by February, according to Cornett. View the complete list of WWD 2012 Top Project winners with information about individual projects.[/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][/et_pb_section]“This award underscores WCSA’s ongoing commitment to providing consistent, reliable service,” says Robbie Cornett, general manager of WCSA. “Our staff continues to develop new and better ways to meet our customers’ water supply needs, and we are pleased to have created a practical solution for the future drinking water needs of Washington County. This project adds 7.4 million gallons per day to our system capacity.” The WCSA-winning project began construction in 2010, when a new raw water intake and treatment facility expansion were required to meet residents’ countywide water supply needs. However, project planning, permitting, property acquisition and design began more than 20 years earlier. Engineers created a unique design that included a submersed intake structure outside the historically sensitive area on the South Fork, where turbidity was lower. Tube settlers and adsorption clarifiers were added, along with five new filters and Francis turbines in a new energy recovery station. Testing conducted in cold weather, cold water and high-turbidity conditions proved the design a success. “Despite facing a number of unique obstacles due to the plant’s location and high water pressure conditions, the WCSA project is being successfully completed under budget with a larger capacity than originally expected,” says Amy McIntosh, assistant editor at Scranton Gillette Communications, which publishes WWD. “The addition of the energy recovery station was an innovative way to combat the high water pressure conditions.” The majority of the project is expected to be fully operational by February, according to Cornett. View the complete list of WWD 2012 Top Project winners with information about individual projects.[/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][/et_pb_section]The editorial staff of WWD judged entries on a variety of obstacles met and overcome, as well as final goals achieved. Nominated projects differed in terms of goal and size, with budgets ranging from $950,000 to $80 million. Submissions were accepted during June, July and August of 2012, and 10 winners were selectedfrom a field of approximately 100 entries. “This award underscores WCSA’s ongoing commitment to providing consistent, reliable service,” says Robbie Cornett, general manager of WCSA. “Our staff continues to develop new and better ways to meet our customers’ water supply needs, and we are pleased to have created a practical solution for the future drinking water needs of Washington County. This project adds 7.4 million gallons per day to our system capacity.” The WCSA-winning project began construction in 2010, when a new raw water intake and treatment facility expansion were required to meet residents’ countywide water supply needs. However, project planning, permitting, property acquisition and design began more than 20 years earlier. Engineers created a unique design that included a submersed intake structure outside the historically sensitive area on the South Fork, where turbidity was lower. Tube settlers and adsorption clarifiers were added, along with five new filters and Francis turbines in a new energy recovery station. Testing conducted in cold weather, cold water and high-turbidity conditions proved the design a success. “Despite facing a number of unique obstacles due to the plant’s location and high water pressure conditions, the WCSA project is being successfully completed under budget with a larger capacity than originally expected,” says Amy McIntosh, assistant editor at Scranton Gillette Communications, which publishes WWD. “The addition of the energy recovery station was an innovative way to combat the high water pressure conditions.” The majority of the project is expected to be fully operational by February, according to Cornett. View the complete list of WWD 2012 Top Project winners with information about individual projects.[/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][/et_pb_section]ABINGDON, Va.—The Washington County Service Authority (WCSA) has won a prestigious project-of-the-year award from a major industry trade publication. Water & Wastes Digest (WWD) recently recognized WCSA’s South Fork Intake and Middle Fork Water Treatment Plant Expansion Project as one of the 10 Top Water & Wastewater Projects for 2012. The editorial staff of WWD judged entries on a variety of obstacles met and overcome, as well as final goals achieved. Nominated projects differed in terms of goal and size, with budgets ranging from $950,000 to $80 million. Submissions were accepted during June, July and August of 2012, and 10 winners were selectedfrom a field of approximately 100 entries. “This award underscores WCSA’s ongoing commitment to providing consistent, reliable service,” says Robbie Cornett, general manager of WCSA. “Our staff continues to develop new and better ways to meet our customers’ water supply needs, and we are pleased to have created a practical solution for the future drinking water needs of Washington County. This project adds 7.4 million gallons per day to our system capacity.” The WCSA-winning project began construction in 2010, when a new raw water intake and treatment facility expansion were required to meet residents’ countywide water supply needs. However, project planning, permitting, property acquisition and design began more than 20 years earlier. Engineers created a unique design that included a submersed intake structure outside the historically sensitive area on the South Fork, where turbidity was lower. Tube settlers and adsorption clarifiers were added, along with five new filters and Francis turbines in a new energy recovery station. Testing conducted in cold weather, cold water and high-turbidity conditions proved the design a success. “Despite facing a number of unique obstacles due to the plant’s location and high water pressure conditions, the WCSA project is being successfully completed under budget with a larger capacity than originally expected,” says Amy McIntosh, assistant editor at Scranton Gillette Communications, which publishes WWD. “The addition of the energy recovery station was an innovative way to combat the high water pressure conditions.” The majority of the project is expected to be fully operational by February, according to Cornett. View the complete list of WWD 2012 Top Project winners with information about individual projects.[/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][/et_pb_section]
ABINGDON, Va.—The Washington County Service Authority (WCSA) has won a prestigious project-of-the-year award from a major industry trade publication. Water & Wastes Digest (WWD) recently recognized WCSA’s South Fork Intake and Middle Fork Water Treatment Plant Expansion Project as one of the 10 Top Water & Wastewater Projects for 2012. The editorial staff of WWD judged entries on a variety of obstacles met and overcome, as well as final goals achieved. Nominated projects differed in terms of goal and size, with budgets ranging from $950,000 to $80 million. Submissions were accepted during June, July and August of 2012, and 10 winners were selectedfrom a field of approximately 100 entries. “This award underscores WCSA’s ongoing commitment to providing consistent, reliable service,” says Robbie Cornett, general manager of WCSA. “Our staff continues to develop new and better ways to meet our customers’ water supply needs, and we are pleased to have created a practical solution for the future drinking water needs of Washington County. This project adds 7.4 million gallons per day to our system capacity.” The WCSA-winning project began construction in 2010, when a new raw water intake and treatment facility expansion were required to meet residents’ countywide water supply needs. However, project planning, permitting, property acquisition and design began more than 20 years earlier. Engineers created a unique design that included a submersed intake structure outside the historically sensitive area on the South Fork, where turbidity was lower. Tube settlers and adsorption clarifiers were added, along with five new filters and Francis turbines in a new energy recovery station. Testing conducted in cold weather, cold water and high-turbidity conditions proved the design a success. “Despite facing a number of unique obstacles due to the plant’s location and high water pressure conditions, the WCSA project is being successfully completed under budget with a larger capacity than originally expected,” says Amy McIntosh, assistant editor at Scranton Gillette Communications, which publishes WWD. “The addition of the energy recovery station was an innovative way to combat the high water pressure conditions.” The majority of the project is expected to be fully operational by February, according to Cornett. View the complete list of WWD 2012 Top Project winners with information about individual projects.